Frequently Asked Questions

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Is there a legal requirement to grit our premises?

No. However, under the Workplace Health, Safety and Welfare Regs: (Regulation 12 – Conditions of floors and traffic routes): Approved Code of Practice states "Arrangements should be made to minimise risks from snow and ice. By not taking any measures you are increasing the risk of any incidents and also any potential liability claims.


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Is it true that if we don't grit we can't be held responsible for any incidents?

No. It's a common misconception that if you don't change the conditions then you can't be liable for any incidents. Certainly on commercial premises where you are inviting both staff and/or the general public onto site this is not the case.


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Some companies suggest they don't need a contract to undertake gritting works – is this an advantage?

A contract will usually better protect your interests. It should set out clearly the service so that both parties have a clear understanding of what is being provided. It may serve to offer you better protection against any liability claims as a contract is clear evidence that formal arrangements have been made to take necessary precautions.


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Should we reduce the number of call outs to save costs?

A good weather reporting system that takes various factors into account to determine the likelihood of frost or ice should help minimise any unnecessary gritting attendances. Hence, reducing your liability risk.


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We were gritted last night and it's freezing tonight, do we need gritting again?

Our advice would be to attend but only grit any areas in need of a top up to avoid over application and to reduce your liability.


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Will gritting prevent snow from settling on the ground?

Not always. It may prevent a light fall from settling but a significant fall will settle on top of grit.


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Can ice and frost still form where areas have been gritted?

In severe cold conditions under minus 9 degrees salt has little effect. However when the temperature rises above  this temperature ice will start to melt. The temperature criteria here will be affected by the ground moisture content and dry density of the salt used.